The FDA Wants Your Cannabis Input so Don’t Be Afraid to Tell It Straight

Deb Tharp | April 12, 2018 | 1 Comment

 

Last winter, we reported that the World Health Organization is reassessing their stance on cannabis. Now the organization is rightfully asking for input from member nations who can’t legalize cannabis due to international treaties.

 

Thankfully, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is asking for our input.

 

What you'll learn in this post:

[Click any of the section titles below to jump there]

 

What Info Does the FDA Want?

 

The notice for public comments asks for opinions on:

 

  • Abuse potential
  • Actual abuse
  • Medical usefulness
  • Trafficking
  • Impact of scheduling changes on availability for medical use

 

While the notice is required by the Controlled Substances Act, the FDA really does use their input – so it’s vital that we contribute. Currently, there are 22.2 million U.S. cannabis users. It’d be very difficult for the federal government to recommend continued global prohibition if inundated with positive comments from each one of them.

 

We can only submit electronic or written comments for this request from now until April 23, 2018. There’s no time to waste!

 

How Do I Submit My Comments?

 

Enter electronic comments here. Don’t leave any personal info you don’t want publicly known as the site’s comments will be reposted in their entirety.

 

If you wish to make a more private statement, send to the address below and be sure it’s postmarked by April 23, 2018:

 

Dockets Management
Staff (HFA-305), Food and Drug Administration
5630 Fishers Lane, Rm. 1061
Rockville, MD 20852

 

What Can I Say?

 

Tell the FDA anything you want to about the plant. Stories explaining its medical usefulness will be particularly helpful. Form letters tend to be less credible, so personal input will prove the most useful.

 

Don’t be shy if you’re not a wordsmith; the agency won’t be checking your grammar. What does matter is those who’ve benefited from medicinal cannabis profess their desire for full descheduling.

 

The government can’t know it no longer has the consent of the governed unless the governed lets it know. This is our chance to be heard loud and clear; let’s flood the powers that be with more positive cannabis opinions than they’ve ever received!

 

We have senators fighting for states’ rights in our nationwide legalization battle, though it’s an uphill one. If we can end the unreasonable international treaties preventing total decriminalization, we can finally end the costly war on weed at home.

 

Please don’t wait; comment today and share this news with everyone you know so they can share their comments too!

 




About Deb Tharp

Deb Tharp is a cannabis activist, consultant, and writer. She began her cannabis activism at the age of 18, helping local candidates campaign door-to-door in the Midwest. Little did she know that the plant would save her husband's life a decade later. After watching him recover from the ravages of kidney failure and add 60 pounds to his skeletal frame in a matter of months, she was convinced that the war on weed must end. She ran for State Assembly in 2010 while completing her bachelor's degree at University of California, Irvine. She stood little chance of winning as one of the state's last Libertarian candidates, but she did manage to bring cannabis legalization to the forefront of the public debate. Little more than a year later, she was publicly arrested while gathering signatures for a local ballot initiative in Orange County. She fired back at the county by qualifying Measure CC in Santa Ana under Kandice Hawes' of OC Norml’s expert leadership. In the following years, she authored, qualified and helped to qualify over a dozen local legalization ballot initiatives across the state while teaching other activists how to do the same. She currently writes for Nugg, the nation's largest online cannabis marketplace, while pursuing her law degree at Taft Law School and will graduate in 2021.


1 Comment

  • Karen Leto

    I have been a proponent for Cannabis for over 40 years. When I became a Pilates Instructor, I did work with people that were getting off hard drugs and introduced them to Cannabis & Exercise. I now read many articles that back up my experience with Cannabis & Exercise. Body and Mind connections while feeling good, breathing and becoming stronger with strength and stretching is the answer to health, mentally and physically.

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